Introducing Akainacephalus johnsoni

Skeletal reconstructions of Akainacephalus johnsoni. From Wiersma and Irmis, 2018

The Ankylosauria is a group of herbivorous, quadrupedal, armoured dinosaurs subdivided in two major clades, the Ankylosauridae and the Nodosauridae. The group is predominantly recorded from the Late Cretaceous (Turonian—late Maastrichtian) of Asia and the last Cretaceous (early Campanian—late Maastrichtian) of western North America (Laramidia). Ankylosauridae were present primarily in Asia and North America, and the most derived members of this clade are characterized by shortened skulls, pyramidal squamosal horns, and tail clubs.

Akainacephalus johnsoni, a new genus and species of an ankylosaurid dinosaur from the upper Campanian Kaiparowits Formation of southern Utah, represents the most complete ankylosaurid specimen from southern Laramidia to date, and reveals new details about the diversity and evolution of this clade. The genus name is derived from the Greek akaina, meaning “thorn” or “spine,” referring to the thorn-like cranial caputegulae of the holotype; and “cephalus,” the Greek meaning for head. The specific epithet honors Randy Johnson, volunteer preparator at the Natural History Museum of Utah.

Skull of Akainacephalus johnsoni. From Wiersma and Irmis, 2018

The holotype (UMNH VP 20202) is a partial skeleton comprising a complete skull, both mandibles, predentary, four dorsal, four dorsosacral, three sacral, one caudosacral, and eight caudal vertebrae, dorsal ribs, a complete tail club, both scapulae, left coracoid, right humerus, right ulna, partial left ilium, left femur, left tibia, left fibula, phalanx, two partial cervical osteoderm half rings, and 17 dorsal and lateral osteoderms of various sizes and morphologies.

The most striking feature of Akainacephalus johnsoni is the skull ornamentation comprising several symmetrical rows of small pyramidal and conical caputegulae along the dorsolateral surface of the skull. The postorbital horns are dorsoventrally tall, backswept, and project laterally in dorsal view. The quadratojugal horns display an  asymmetrical triangular morphology with a vertically positioned apex. Only a partial squamosal horn is preserved, but is largely broken.

Life reconstruction of Akainacephalus johnsoni (Image credit: Andrey Atuchin and the Denver Museum of Nature & Science)

The unique anatomical features of Akainacephalus johnsoni indicate a close taxonomic relationship with Nodocephalosaurus kirtlandensis, that clearly distinguish them from other Late Cretaceous Laramidian (although both taxa are temporally separated by nearly three million years). Because both taxa a more closely related to Asian ankylosaurids, the geographic distribution of Late Cretaceous ankylosaurids throughout the Western Interior could be the result of several geologically brief intervals of lowered sea level that allowed Asian ankylosaurid dinosaurs to immigrate to North America several times during the Late Cretaceous. The dispersal of ankylosaurids into Laramidia is coeval with the dispersal of other dinosaur clades, like tyrannosaurids and ceratopsians. The climate gradients and the fluctuations in sea level, may have helped reinforced Campanian provincialism.

 

References:

Wiersma JP, Irmis RB. (2018) A new southern Laramidian ankylosaurid, Akainacephalus johnsoni gen. et sp. nov., from the upper Campanian Kaiparowits Formation of southern Utah, USA. PeerJ 6:e5016 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.5016

Arbour, V. M.; Currie, P. J. (2015). “Systematics, phylogeny and palaeobiogeography of the ankylosaurid dinosaurs”. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology: 1–60. doi: 10.1080/14772019.2015.1059985

Meet Borealopelta markmitchelli

Holotype of Borealopelta markmitchelli (From Brown et al., 2017)

The Ankylosauria is a group of herbivorous, quadrupedal, armoured dinosaurs subdivided in two major clades, the Ankylosauridae and the Nodosauridae. The most derived members of this clade are characterized by shortened skulls, pyramidal squamosal horns, and tail clubs, among other features. Nodosauridae have a kinked ischium and more massive osteoderms, but lack a tail club. Ankylosaurs were present primarily in Asia and North America,  but the early origins of this clade are ambiguous. A three-dimensionally preserved ankylosaurian discovered in the Suncor Millennium Mine in northeastern Alberta, Canada, offers new evidence for understanding the anatomy of this group.

The new specimen, Borealopelta markmitchelli, from the Early Cretaceous of Alberta, preserves integumentary structures as organic layers, including continuous fields of epidermal scales and intact horn sheaths capping the body armor. The generic name Borealopelta is derived from “borealis” (Latin, “northern”) and “pelta” (Greek, “shield”). The specific epithet markmitchelli honors Mark Mitchell for his preparation of the holotype.

Schematic drawing of TMP 2011.033.0001 in dorsal view (From Brown et al., 2017)

The holotype (TMP 2011.033.0001), with an estimated living mass of 1,300 kg, is an articulated specimen preserving the head, neck, most of the trunk and sacrum, a complete right and a partial left forelimb and manus, and partial pes. The skull is covered in dermal plates, which are overlain by their associated epidermal scales. Cervical and thoracic osteoderms form continuous transverse rows completely separated by transverse rows of polygonal basement scale. Osteoderms are covered by a thick, dark gray to black organic layer, representing the original, diagenetically altered, keratinous epidermal scales. The distribution of the film correlates well to the expected distribution of melanin, a pigment present in some vertebrate integumentary structures. The keratinized tissues in this nodosaur are heavily pigmented. The possible presence of eumelanin and pheomelanin, suggested it had reddish-brown camouflage. The evidence of countershading in a large, heavily armored herbivorous dinosaur also provides a unique insight into the predator-prey dynamic of the Cretaceous Period.

 

References:

Brown, C.M.; Henderson, D.M.; Vinther, J.; Fletcher, I.; Sistiaga, A.; Herrera, J.; Summons, R.E. “An Exceptionally Preserved Three-Dimensional Armored Dinosaur Reveals Insights into Coloration and Cretaceous Predator-Prey Dynamics”. Current Biology. doi:10.1016/j.cub.2017.06.071

Arbour, V. M.; Currie, P. J. (2015). “Systematics, phylogeny and palaeobiogeography of the ankylosaurid dinosaurs”. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology: 1–60. doi: 10.1080/14772019.2015.1059985

Zuul, the Gatekeeper

Skull of Zuul (Photograph: Brian Boyle/Royal Ontario Museum)

The Ankylosauria is a group of herbivorous, quadrupedal, armoured dinosaurs subdivided in two major clades, the Ankylosauridae and the Nodosauridae. Zuul crurivastator, from the Coal Ridge Member of the Judith River Formation of northern Montana, is the most complete ankylosaurid ever found in North America. The generic name refers to Zuul the Gatekeeper of Gozer (from the 1984 film Ghostbusters), and the species epithet combines crus (Latin) for shin or shank, and vastator (Latin) for destroyer, in reference to the sledgehammer-like tail club. The extraordinary preservation of abundant soft tissue in the skeleton, including in situ osteoderms and skin impressions make this specimen an important reference for understanding the evolution of dermal and epidermal structures in this clade. Until the discovery of Zuul, Laramidian ankylosaurin specimens were primarily assigned to three taxa: Euoplocephalus tutus and Ankylosaurus magniventris from northern Laramidia, and Nodocephalosaurus kirtlandensis from southern Laramidia.

The holotype (ROM 75860)  is a partial skeleton consisting of a nearly complete cranium, and a partially articulated postcranium. It is estimated to be over 6 metres long, and it would have weighed approximately 2500 kg. It has been dated to approximately 75 million years ago, and it was discovered accidentally on 16 May 2014 during overburden removal for a scattered tyrannosaurid skeleton, when a skid-steer loader encountered the tail club knob.

Overview of the tail of Zuul crurivastator in dorsal view, with insets of detailed anatomy (From Arbour and Evans, 2017)

The skull is almost complete, missing only the tip of the right quadratojugal horn and the ventral edge of the vomers, and is the largest ankylosaurine skull recovered from Laramidia. The skull is relatively flat dorsally, and had an elaborate ornamentation across the snout. The squamosal horns are robust and pyramid-shaped, and the quadratojugal horns had a sharp, posteriorly offset apex.

The tail club (including the 13 caudal vertebrae in the handle and the knob) is at least 210 cm long. Osteoderms are preserved not only in the anterior, flexible portion of the tail but also along the tail club handle. The first three pairs of caudal osteoderms are covered with a black film, that probably represent preserved keratin, and is similar to the texture observed at the base of bovid horn sheaths.

The discovery of Zuul fills a gap in the ankylosaurine record and further highlights that Laramidian ankylosaurines were undergoing rapid evolutionary rates and stratigraphic turnover as observed for Laramidian ceratopsids, hadrosaurids, pachycephalosaurids and tyrannosaurids.

References:

Arbour V. M., Evans D. C., (2017), A new ankylosaurine dinosaur from the Judith River Formation of Montana, USA, based on an exceptional skeleton with soft tissue preservation , Royal Society Open Science, rsos.royalsocietypublishing.org/lookup/doi/10.1098/rsos.161086

Arbour, V. M.; Currie, P. J. (2015). “Systematics, phylogeny and palaeobiogeography of the ankylosaurid dinosaurs”. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology: 1–60. doi: 10.1080/14772019.2015.1059985