Meet Iberodactylus.

Partial rostrum of Iberodactylus andreui. From Holgado et. al, 2019

Pterosaurs were the first flying vertebrates. The group achieved high levels of morphologic and taxonomic diversity during the Mesozoic, with more than 200 species recognized so far. From the Late Triassic to the end of the Cretaceous, the evolution of pterosaurs resulted in a variety of eco-morphological adaptations, as evidenced by differences in skull shape, dentition, neck length, tail length and wing span. Because of the fragile nature of their skeletons the fossil record of pterosaurs is strongly biased towards marine and lacustrine depositional environments.

Pterosaurs have been divided into two major groups: “rhamphorhynchoids” and “pterodactyloids”. Rhamphorhynchoids are characterized by a long tail, and short neck and metacarpus. Pterodactyloids have a much larger body size range, an elongated neck and metacarpus, and a relatively short tail, and ruled the sky from the Late Jurassic to the End Cretaceous.

Comparison of the rostrum of Iberodactylus andreui with a cast of a skull of Hamipterus tianshanensis. From Holgado et al., 2019

The record of Iberian pterosaurs is scarce, but a new taxa from the Lower Cretaceous of Spain reveals an unexpected relationship with Hamipterus tianshanensis from the Lower Cretaceous of China. Iberodactylus andreui gen. et sp. nov., was recovered at Los Quiñones site, close to the village of Obón (Teruel, Spain), at the end of the 1980s by Javier Andreau. The holotype (MPZ-2014/1) consists of the anterior portion of the rostrum (~198 mm in length), and includes a partially preserved premaxillary crest, and a fragment of the maxillary bone with several fragmentary teeth. The specimen preserved its original 3D shape, although exhibits frequent fractured bones, that added to the eroded bone surfaces, reveal an external thing layer of cortical bone of 1.5 mm. The robustness and height of the premaxillary crest, suggest that MPZ-2014/1 may represent a male specimen.

The most striking feature of MPZ-2014/1 is the premaxillary crest. This crest exhibits well-developed elongated, sub-vertical striae and sulci, anteriorly curved, a combination that is quite similar to Hamipterus tianshanensis from the Berriasian-Albian of China. It was suggested that the sulci could be interpreted as a trait related to the attachment of the rhamphotheca, as in the case of some extant birds.

Origin and radiation of the clade Anhangueria during the Early Cretaceous. From Holgado et al., 2019

Phylogenetic analyses indicate that Hamipterus tianshanensis and Iberodactylus andreui gen. et sp. nov. form a monophyletic group, the Hamipteridae fam. nov., that falls within the Anhangueria, sharing with other anhanguerians the presence of a lateral expansion on the rostral tips. Anhanguerians has been recorded elsewhere in the Early Cretaceous of Europe, however Iberodactylus is not closely related to any known European anhanguerian, suggesting that the clade Anhangueria could have ancestral connections to eastern Laurasia.

Other tetrapod lineages are recorded in the Iberian Peninsula with close affinities to Asian faunas. Those lineages include titanosauriforms, crocodyliforms, enanthiornitean birds, and the gobiconodontid mammal Spinolestes xenarthrosus related to Gobiconodon and Repenomamus.

Reference:

Borja Holgado, Rodrigo V. Pêgas, José Ignacio Canudo, Josep Fortuny, Taissa Rodrigues, Julio Company & Alexander W.A. Kellner, 2019, “On a new crested pterodactyloid from the Early Cretaceous of the Iberian Peninsula and the radiation of the clade Anhangueria”, Scientific Reports 9: 4940

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2 thoughts on “Meet Iberodactylus.

  1. Pingback: Fossil Friday* Roundup: March 24, 2019 | PLOS Paleo Community

  2. Pingback: T10E24. Mary Anning | Iberodactylus | Osiris-REx | GeoCastAway

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